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Ditch the script; have a conversation instead!

Posted By Alison Rak, Monday, March 20, 2017

Nobody likes a telemarketer, so why use their techniques in recruiting? Why are researchers still  getting away with putting participants through long, boring, tedious screeners? A conversational approach to your recruit may seem difficult or impractical, but if done well can yield excellent results in the way of highly-qualified, happier participants.

What is a conversational recruit? It’s a way of getting all of the answers to your screener, and then some, through a friendly conversation. There are a few key requirements for success, however. First, you need to be completely aligned with your recruiter on your screening criteria. This typically requires a detailed conversation, backed up in writing, versus just emailing over a screener. Second, you need to trust your recruiter completely that they will not lead the participant, and that they have your best interests in mind. Finally, you need a recruiter who will have a small number of qualified, intelligent people who are well-trained with your project working for you, versus a firm that will put a large number of interchangeable dialers on your project.

Some researchers attempt a conversational recruit by writing a conversational screener, but these fall short. Potential participants can tell when someone is reading from a script and it’s a turnoff. A skilled, conversational recruiter, on the other hand, can knock off a number of screener questions in a brief exchange. Here’s an example of three questions from a typical screener:

First, a written introductory paragraph that, no matter how casual the recruiter tries to make it, will come across as a script and set the tone for the rest of the exchange. Then come the questions:

  1. What age range do you fall into?
    1. under 18 (terminate)
    2. 18-24
    3. 25-34
    4. 35-44
    5. 45-54
    6. 55 or older (terminate)

2. Do you have kids living at home? If so, what are their ages?

3. Do you or anyone in your household work in any of the following industries?

  1. Education
  2. Marketing
  3. Advertising
  4. Public relations
  5. Transportation
  6. Technology
  7. etc. etc. etc.

3. (Articulation question) If you could go anywhere on vacation, where would you go and why?

Now, imagine trying to achieve the same thing through a conversational approach.

After a brief introduction….

Recruiter: Tell me a little about yourself. For example, how old are you, what do you do for work, and who do you live with?

Potential participants: Well, let’s see…. I’m 42 years old, a stay-at-home mom. I live with my husband and two kids, plus a golden retriever who acts like my third kid!

Recruiter: “Oh, I love goldens! How old are your kids?

Participant: My daughter Izzy is four and my son Burke is eight.

Recruiter: Wow, you have your hands full. What does your husband do for work?

Participant: He’s a chef for Intuit.

Recruiter: Nice! Does he cook for you at home?

Participant: He does! He’s a great cook. During the week I usually feed the kids before he comes home but he will whip something up for the two of us and it’s always delicious. I’m very lucky!

You get the idea. The conversational approach got all of the key information from original screener, and then some. The participant is much more engaged, and an articulation question becomes irrelevant.

Taking it a step further, the recruiter now has established a rapport with the participant and can write up a blurb for the researcher, versus only typing stats into a grid. As a researcher, I appreciate getting an email with a blurb about a hold (e.g.“Rachel is a stay-at-home mom of two and very articulate. She meets all of the criteria but is a hold because her husband works in the technology industry (for Intuit), but as a chef.”) I can read it and quickly respond “Yes, let’s accept Rachel” (I was screening out people who work in tech, but a chef for a technology company will be fine for this project.) It’s far preferable over getting an email (“Attached is your latest grid, with a hold for your review”) which I then have to open and read through to find out the reason for the hold.

A conversational approach to recruiting brings about so many benefits but most of all, it’s consistent with our work and our industry values of being both qualitative and humane.

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Trust, Yet Verify: a new twist on recruiting

Posted By Alison Rak, Monday, March 20, 2017

Traditional recruiting methods typically follow a standard practice of keeping the study topic blind, or keeping a key screening criteria secret in order to weed out potential cheaters. Researchers have become skilled in drafting carefully-worded screener questions with the sole intent of beating these dreaded cheaters at their own game, and as we’ve done so the cheaters have become more skilled as well. It’s like a game of cat and mouse, and can be exhausting.

But what if we were to take a different approach? A “trust, yet verify” technique flies in the face of some traditional methods, yet can be more efficient and more effective, while simultaneously treating our participants with more respect.

How does “Trust, yet Verify” apply to recruiting? Imagine that you are looking for people who have purchased a specific widget online within the last six months. A traditional screener will likely cast a wide net, and then narrow it by asking potential participants a range of item types that they may have purchased, finally getting down to the specific widget. This may work, but is extremely time-consuming (in a day and age when screeners are getting longer, and participants have less patience than ever before.) In addition, it relies on the honesty and accurate recollection of potential participants, which carries inherent risks.

So how about just asking people up front: “Have you purchased an XYZ widget in the past six months? If so, we need you for our research study!” This will attract two types of people: (1) people who purchased the widget, and feel uniquely qualified to participate; and (2) a few people who have not purchased the widget, but want a way to make quick buck. It also avoids wasting valuable time of people who don’t qualify, but may have responded to a more general query and gone through the screening process only to be disqualified.

Next, you put them through a screening process that is quick and efficient (because they’ve already met your key criteria.) Finally, the key step: require proof of purchase. Have the potential participants email you a receipt of their purchase. Legitimate participants will have no trouble doing this, and those potential cheaters will quickly be weeded out.

We’ve used this method successfully in a range of ways, for example: to verify purchases as in the example above, to confirm subscriptions, to check job titles on LinkedIn, and to make sure the participant matches who they say they are by viewing public social media profiles. We’ve found that it dramatically increases the quality of participants and for a researcher, it’s great to go into a study with confidence that the participants have been carefully vetted. Of course, while most potential cheaters will simply make up an excuse to not provide proof (don’t believe it! disqualify them!) some will actually go to some length to continue their lie by adding said item to an online cart and then sending a screenshot of their cart, for example. By taking the time to vet people in this “proof” step, these tricks can be caught fairly easily.

Obviously if a project requires that participants not know that you are seeking people who have purchased this widget then this approach wouldn’t apply, but in most recruits there are at least some elements that can leverage this “Trust, yet Verify” approach.

It can also be a valuable step to avoid an honest participant or recruiter mistake. For example, if you want to make sure someone has just the right widget before you head into an in-home, have them send in a photo of it prior. Yes, it’s an extra step in the recruit, but is well worth it to avoid scheduling a two-hour in-home with someone who doesn’t own the relevant product.

With so much information available online, and with the increased tech-savviness of everyday participants, it only makes sense that we evolve our recruiting to keep up. So for your next project think about how you can trust, yet verify. You’ll be glad you did!

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QRCA Announces Annual Award Recipients for 2017

Posted By Conference Team, Thursday, February 9, 2017

The Qualitative Research Consultants Association (QRCA) recently announced the recipients of its association awards, which were given out at the organization’s annual conference in Los Angeles, held in mid-January.

Global Outreach ScholarshipOana Rengle, Bucharest, Romania

Introduced in 2008, the Global Outreach Scholarship is awarded annually to qualitative researchers from outside the US, UK or Canada. Because international qualitative researchers may not have high-quality professional development opportunities within their own countries, QRCA offers winners the opportunity to experience first-hand QRCA’s Annual Conference with its unique culture of learning and sharing. The 2017 winner, Oana Rengle runs her own qualitative consultancy, Anamnesis, in Bucharest. Oana is a force of nature with a larger-than-life personality. She is a driven investigator of all things qualitative. Oana explores, compares, and shares whatever she learns about methodologies and how to make them work for clients, transcending international borders.

Maryanne Pflug Spirit AwardSusan Sweet, Sweet Insight Group, Lafayette, Colo.

The Maryanne Pflug Spirit Award upholds and celebrates QRCA’s cultural heritage of collegiality among members and commitment to the organization, and is awarded to a member who demonstrates “spirit” in the association. The recipient is selected by a committee of former recipients, from candidates nominated by members. Susan Sweet is a former board member, committee leader and leader in planning the worldwide conference. Among the statements made by nominators, “When the association tries to settle into status quo, she pushes for fresh, young energy. When a committee starts to slog, she gives it life. She embodies Maryanne's qualities of friendliness, passion, and unconditional positive regard for all.  Her enthusiasm and passion are infectious.”

President's AwardLynn Greenberg, Lynn Greenberg Associates, Hastings on Hudson, N.Y.

This award is given for exemplary service and dedication to QRCA to a volunteer member who is not on the board of directors. It recognizes contributions within the past year and/or during a career/lifetime of work. The recipient is chosen by the board and the award is presented by the president at the annual conference. Lynn Greenberg is a past president, was the first annual conference chair, and remains an active committee leader. Some of the things said of Lynn by nominators included, “She's an Olympic-class collaborator. She is a dynamo… Lynn is an inspiration who constantly keeps growing, learning, re-inventing. She keeps it fresh and real. She’s a powerhouse of energy.”

Qually Award – Tory Gentes, The Palmerston Group, Lebanon, N.H.

The QRCA Qualitative Excellence Award is the premiere award in the industry and is awarded annually to a practitioner or practitioners who exhibit a mastery of knowledge of qualitative methodology and thinking. In the past this award was presented for a previously executed project; however, this year the award was based on the best response to an RFP for a hypothetical client. Submissions were made by QRCA members and voted on by QRCA members. Tory Gentes was recognized for her creative and innovative proposal addressing transportation challenges in California and received a prize of $1,000 USD and a trophy.

Rising Star AwardAnya Zadrozny, AnyaZMedia, New York, N.Y.

Introduced in 2009, this award recognizes QRCA’s newer, younger members for their leadership and significant contribution to QRCA. The recipient is chosen by the board, from candidates nominated by members. Anya Zadrozny is a past Young Professional Grant winner and active marketing committee member. In presenting the award to Anya, QRCA president Manny Schrager noted her achievements, including a significant contribution to several committees, “Anya is super talented and an ‘overachiever’ for QRCA, including producing a video that communicated the new QRCA brand position and coordinating videos that will be used to promote QRCA in the future.”

Tags:  2017 award winners  maryanne pflug award  presidents award  qrca  qually award  rising star award 

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Winners of Qualitative Research Consultants Association (QRCA) 2017 Young Professionals Grant Announced

Posted By YPG Team, Wednesday, December 7, 2016

The Qualitative Research Consultants Association (QRCA) has announced the winners of its 2017 Young Professionals Grant (YPG) program:

  • Caitlin Homstad, The Research Partnership, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Sarah Brown, Kelton, Los Angeles, California
  • Russell Edwards, Precision Dialogue and University of South Florida Applied Anthropology Ph.D. candidate, Tampa, Florida
  • Rebecca Fowler, FedEx Services, Memphis, Tennessee
  • Bernadette Lockamyeir, Consumer Insights, Rochester, New York
  • Jennifer Myers, Ipsos RDA, Macomb, Michigan
  • Brandon Richard, The Link Group, Durham, North Carolina
  • Keith J. Romer, The Garage Group, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Daniela Rubio, Independent Consultant, San Francisco, California
  • Kelsey Segaloff, Chadwick Martin Bailey, Boston, Massachusetts  
  • Nathalia Vega, Blackstone Group, Chicago, Illinois
  • Ashleigh Williams, C+R Research, Chicago, Illinois

The QRCA thanks its YPG partners, FocusVision, M/A/R/C Research and Schlesinger Associates, for their generosity in increasing the number of grants they funded from 10 to 12 due to the high volume of applications received.

These recipients, who demonstrated keen interest and dedication to the field, have been awarded passes to attend the QRCA’s Annual Conference in Los Angeles, California, January 18-20, 2017. This annual conference is the premier gathering for qualitative practitioners (QRCs), with unparalleled opportunities to connect and network with other QRCs, expand and strengthen skill sets via hands-on collaborative practice, learn from the best of the best in the industry, refresh your perspective, and reinvigorate your business with new methodologies, tools, and partners.

“The YPG program has been such a wonderful win/win/win for the QRCA as a whole, our members and the grant recipients,” says QRCA President Manny Schrager. “Former grant winners have become actively engaged QRCA members, seeing how membership and volunteering leads to continued growth through both learning and networking.  Current members enjoy meeting with recipients who often bring fresh thinking to their approach to qualitative research. We’re excited to once again have so many highly qualified applicants which made the job of the selection committee a very difficult one.”

For more information about the YPG program, please visit qrca.org/ypg and follow #YoungQRCA on Twitter.

Tags:  2017  grant winner  young professionals grant  young qrca 

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The QRCA Annual Conference Team Invites You to Take an On-site Tour

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 16, 2016
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We are already nearing 100 attendees for the QRCA Annual Conference – wow! If you haven’t already committed to join us, take a quick tour with conference co-chairs Jeff Walkowski and Kate Wagenlander-Watson! Learn more about our fabulous conference hotel and prepare to get powerful new perspectives on Qualitative Research. Three full days of cutting-edge information, now open to more research professionals than ever before.

Get all the details or register today!

register today

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Exploring the Hidden Gems of Boyle Heights and East L.A.

Posted By Susanna (Whitmore) Fránek, Cultural Anthropologist, Ethnologix, Wednesday, November 16, 2016
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Need some relief from the election outcome? Anyone remember Cheech and Chong from the 1970s?  Born in East LA?  Check it out, and if by chance you’re staying over the weekend after the conference, might I suggest you go east instead of west for something different?  

Exploring L.A.’s “real” Eastside — not Silver Lake or Echo Park — if not Boyle Heights and East L.A., just might resonate with some QRCA out-of-towners.  To get there, you can either walk from the hotel or take Uber to the Metro Gold Line at the Little Tokyo/Arts District station on Alameda. Go 2 stops to Mariachi Plaza in Boyle Heights.

Although the majority population in Boyle Heights and ELA is now Latino, the area (since its modern inception in the late 1880s) has been referred to as the Ellis Island of the West, reflecting diverse communities from Eastern Europe, from across the Pacific and Mexico, all of which settled in the area.  

For example, the black and Italian labor force built many of the great Queen Ann and Victorian mansions in Boyle Heights.

Russian Molokans, Serbians and Armenians fleeing the horrors of repression in their homelands made it their home, as did smaller pockets of Japanese and Chinese families that migrated over the river from Little Tokyo and Chinatown.

The acceleration of repression against Jews throughout Eastern Europe saw the development of the largest Jewish community in Los Angeles. By the late 1930s, Brooklyn Avenue, renamed César Chávez Avenue in 1994, was the main thoroughfare of Jewish L.A.  

During those same years, the instability during the Revolution in Mexico brought a significant concentration of Mexican migration to the U.S. Cheap housing, employment and a tolerant community attracted Mexicanos into the area; their cultural life, churches, schools, and clubs grew alongside the Jewish community. Jews and Mexicans lived side by side, studied, played sports and conducted business together; even left wing thinkers met and organized, which is perhaps part of the legacy of political activism that’s still alive and well today.

Today at Mariachi Plaza the refurbished historic Boyle hotel, built in 1898, is an important historical icon that’s part of the predominantly blue-collar, immigrant Mexican neighborhood, yet the area is now in full swing gentrification. The historic hotel is where mariachis have lived and jammed for over half a century; the plaza in front is where they still hang out waiting to be hired.  The rise of spaces such as Libros Schmibros, a lending library and bookstore also on the plaza, attest to the creation of new cultural spaces that have the potential to bring both East and Westside communities together. Yet, new development implies relocation for many families in the area; an ongoing debate is taking place about the future of the mariachis and other long-time residents.

Walking Brooklyn Avenue back in the day, you’d experience a vibrant cultural life and a commerce community of bustling storefront businesses where more Yiddish was spoken than English. After WWII, the community migrated west to the Fairfax district and into the San Fernando Valley, but the Jewish legacy in Boyle Heights and East L.A. is still present today.

The Breed Street Shul, a beacon of Jewish heritage, is just a mile walk up César Chávez, then a right on Breed Street. While the front building is currently under renovation, its back building is now a cross-cultural community center that connects historical and modern day Boyle Heights. Creative mixed use of the space includes Day of the Dead festivities and Passover services, for either Quinceañeras or Bar Mitzvahs. In today’s political environment, these examples of cultural coexistence are sorely needed. 

To go deeper, one just needs to explore the handful of cemeteries that dot the Eastside landscape to get a sense for the demographic transitions that have taken place over the past century, and that attest to the natural flow of ethnically diverse residents from other parts of town that migrated in and out of the area.

There are the Serbian and Chinese cemeteries, the large Evergreen and Calvary cemeteries. One of the first mortuaries was founded and is still run by a French Basque family.

There are two Jewish cemeteries: At Home of Peace, noted rabbis, along with Curly and Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges, and Warner Bros. co-founder Jack Warner, are laid to rest. Then there’s Mount Zion, in need of dire repair. The great Yiddish writer Lamed Shapiro, who wrote stories about the horrendous pograms in Eastern Europe, died a pauper in L.A., and was buried there.

That’s a lot to take in, so here are some suggestions for lunch:

La Serenata Garibaldi, across the street from Mariachi plaza.

Or you can try some traditional Mexican birria (goat stew) at Birriería Dedonboni just up the street from Mariachi plaza.

Guisados is over on César Chávez Ave. not far from the Breed Street Shul.

Let me know if you’d like some company exploring these prized treasures. I’m also game to play tour guide!

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Predicting Election 2016: What Worked, What Didn’t and the Implications for Marketing & Insights

Posted By Leonard Murphy, Greenbook, Wednesday, November 16, 2016
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Almost everyone failed to predict the outcome of the 2016 U.S. election, and the winner came as a shock to many pollsters, the media, and people in the U.S. and around the world. How did we get it so wrong, and what does this mean for marketing and insights?

On November 29th, we’ll be exploring that very topic at our upcoming event, Predicting Election 2016: What Worked, What didn’t and the Implications for Marketing & Insights, brought to you by GreenBook and the ARF.

The event will take place from 8:30am to 11am.  We’ll start with webinar with 4 short presentations related to new thinking about predicting election results and then transition to a live-streamed panel with key thought leaders and experts for a lively discussion on what we can learn from this election cycle related to tools to predict outcomes. The agenda is still coming together so look for an update on specific presenters soon, but trust us, it’s going to be very, very good.

For those in New York, we’d love to have you join us live at the ARF Headquarters in New York, but the event will be available to join virtually as well.

Register here: http://thearf.org/event/nov-29-2016-predicting-election-2016/

During this event, we won’t be rehash the polls or outcome of the election, but rather explore the implications of this polling failure for commercial research and analytics on the things that are important to our industry: trust in research (especially surveys!), new tools and techniques, predicting & modeling behavior or trends, implicit vs. explicit data sources, the application of cognitive & behavioral psychology, and more.

Now is the time to have meaningful conversations about the lessons learned from this election cycle and to apply those learnings to not only political polling, but public policy and commercial research in all of their many forms. Arguably approaches using experimental polling methods social media analyticsbehavioral economics-based analysis“big data”meta analysis and data synthesis, and text analytics were more predictive of the results than traditional polling, and the implications of that for other forms of research should not be ignored. Conversely, are some of the approached pioneered in commercial research for ad testing, forecasting, attribution modelling, etc.. applicable to increase the accuracy of polling?

We’ll be tackling all of these topics and more during this joint program with the ARF, so we hope you’ll join us virtually or in person for the discussion!

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Qually Finalists Announced!

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 9, 2016
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After careful consideration of all entries, we are excited to share the six proposals that were selected as finalists for the 2017 award. These proposals showcase some of the fresh, smart, forward-thinking and talented professionals that make up QRCA. These proposals are in response to a hypothetical RFP that was posted here.

The winner of the 2017 QRCA Qualitative Excellence Award winner is selected from amongst the finalists by QRCA members in a blinded vote. You can only vote once.

The winner (or winning team) of the 2017 Qualitative Excellence Award will be announced at the Annual Conference in Los Angeles on January 19 and receive a $1,000 prize.

As we now know, your vote is extremely important. Click here to view the finalists!

Tags:  2017 winners  qually award winners  submissions  vote 

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Stay the Weekend to Explore Some of Downtown L.A.’s (DTLA) Hidden Gems

Posted By Susanna (Whitmore) Fránek, Cultural Anthropologist, Ethnologix Susanna_franek@ethnologix.com, Wednesday, October 12, 2016
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Have you ever wondered how Harold Lloyd filmed his famous clock scene in Safety Last! (1923)?  Are you a movie buff who knows the answers to obscure questions on quiz shows about old Hollywood films? Maybe you’re an architectural enthusiast interested in old historic buildings, or perhaps old movie theaters make you feel part of a bygone era.

If intrigued even slightly by Hollywood’s Golden Era, one good reason out of many to stay in DTLA over the weekend following the January 18 – 20, 2017 QRCA Annual Conference is to catch a Saturday, 10:00AM Los Angeles Conservancy walking tour of DTLA’s opulent theatre district.

https://www.laconservancy.org/events/broadway-historic-theatre-and-commercial-district-walking-tour

The 6-block, South Broadway corridor — just 7 blocks from the JW Marriott — is home to the first and largest historic theatre district in the world.

Fifteen movie palaces line the Broadway corridor. The larger theaters have gone through stages of renovation and stand as magnificent as when they opened during 1910 and the early 1930s. The smaller theaters have converted into flea markets, churches, or still remain part DTLA’s jewelry mart.

The walking tour focuses on the unique architectural history of the movie palaces. It is only $15 for 2.5-hours, and led by well-versed volunteer docents that have great stories of lore to share. At least a month out, you should go online to register for Saturday the 21st, reservations are required.

As an extra bonus, you’ll get a sense for Broadway’s ongoing revitalization. The many cultures of Los Angeles converge as quinceañera shops and botanicas still coexist with new restaurants, galleries and urban retail that cater to both L.A.’s Latino community and the newer condo/apartment-renting downtown residents.  DTLA’s renaissance has been in full swing for decades, gentrification positions the old and the new alongside each other, yet the jury is still out on its sustainability. Displacement of Latino-owned businesses is an ongoing controversy, but along Broadway you can still capture that cultural comingling.

And in case you’re a die-hard Hollywood film aficionado, here’s the specifics on exactly where (9th and Broadway) and how Harold Lloyd created his stunts for Safety Last!

After your walking tour, there are multiple options for lunch. You might want to explore the renovated Clifton’s Cafeteria on 7th and Broadway, or the Grand Central Market between 5th & 4th Streets — L.A.'s oldest and largest open-air market — where dozens of food vendors will whet your appetite; with either option you’ll relive some of L.A. historic moments. 

In the afternoon, why not walk on up to Grand Ave. where the Broad Museum, DTLA’s newest contemporary art museum, sits across the street from Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall, both architectural wonders not to be missed.

You can even reserve free general admission tickets to the Broad Museum a month in advance. Tickets for January will become available on December 1 at 12:00PM PST.  Put it on your calendar because they run out quickly.

On the evening of Saturday, January 21, classical music fans might want to hear the world-famous L.A. Philharmonic perform Mussorgsky, Prokofiev and Stravinsky with violinist Gil Shaham, conducted by Lionel Bringuier.

If you’re an architectural enthusiast, the Hall also has a self-guided audio tour that will introduce you to some of the most fascinating engineering in modern architecture.

So, instead of rushing out to Santa Monica or Venice, which gets so much airtime when out-of-towners come to Los Angeles, I encourage you to explore something new. You’ll come away in awe of all the creativity the DTLA corridor has to offer. And, there’s always airbnb in case you want a different experience outside the hotel over the weekend.  There are multiple options to stay in the heart of DTLA.

For more ideas on exciting off-the-beaten-track things to explore over the weekend following the conference, stay tuned for my next article on discovering Boyle Heights and East L.A.’s Latino community, and it’s rich multicultural history, just a Metro ride from DTLA.

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Mobile Schmobile: Taking in-the-moment into in-context learning

Posted By Administration, Friday, August 19, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, August 17, 2016
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QRCA member Pam Goldfarb Liss works a lot with kids, teens, and their parents — and she sees that smartphones and tablets are a very important part of the way in which they communicate. According to Pam, you might say that smartphones are a third arm for many of them.

The research territory around the smartphone and tablets is called mobile research — and it allows us to experience our targets’ lives in 3-D. Mobile research is an effective way to get windows into our targets’ world as we complete research tasks. When qualitative researchers provide this perspective for clients, in-context learning leads to powerful product and service insights and ideation.

Yet, Pam says, when we get “in-the-moment” photos, videos or even recorded audio notes, researchers may not get an explanation of the context of that moment: Consumers are willing to share it all, but are not always so good about telling us the reasons for certain actions or behaviors after they’ve posted material for a mobile study.

That’s why choosing the right research tool for your client’s objectives is the most important consideration. Pam goes on to explain several platforms for mobile research, as well as providing rules of thumb for creating appropriate and fun mobile activities.

Read the full article here.

Tags:  communication  mobile  mobile platforms  mobile research  pam goldfarb liss  qrca views  smartphones  tablets  teenagers  views article 

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